Tag Archives: Wendell Berry

Against the Objective

I finally sat down to watch the documentary about the life and work of Wendell Berry, Look and See.  I’d been putting off for a month, but a five-hour plane ride can inspire you like that. The movie begins with … Continue reading

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Community and Wholeness

A few weeks ago, I posted a quick reflection on Wendell Berry’s thoughts on community and health.  I think about that essay often, which is why another chunk of it shows up here today.  This is from 1994, before the … Continue reading

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Health and Community

From Wendell Berry’s “Health is Membership”: I believe that health is wholeness . . . I am not “against technology” so much as I am for community.  When the choice is between the health of a community and technological innovation, … Continue reading

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Wendell Berry and Why I Reread the Lord of the Rings

From Wendell Berry’s essay, “In Defense of Literacy”: . . . We must know a better language.  We must speak, and teach our children to speak, a language precise and articulate and lively enough to tell the truth about the … Continue reading

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Every Day Committed

One of my favorite Wendell Berry quotes comes from his “Notes from an Absence and a Return,” which can be found in A Continuous Harmony.   The short journal recounts Berry’s thoughts and experiences of returning to his Kentucky farm … Continue reading

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When Life is Category over Character

Reading Wendell Berry in the 21st century is strange, mainly because much of what he wrote in the 1990s (and even the 1980s) is still relevant today.  I think it’s relevant, even if only as a reminder of the way … Continue reading

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Between Parties and Politics

Lately I’ve been reading some of Wendell Berry’s older essays, most of them dating to the 1980s and 90s.  The first collection that I read, Another Turn of the Crank, begins with an interesting acknowledgment, even and especially twenty years … Continue reading

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